Fermer les détails sur les cookies

Ce site utilise des témoins. En apprendre plus à propos des témoins.

OverDrive désire utiliser des fichiers témoins pour stocker des informations sur votre ordinateur afin d'améliorer votre expérience sur notre site Web. Un des fichiers témoins que nous utilisons est très important pour certains aspects du fonctionnement du site, et il a déjà été stocké. Vous pouvez supprimer ou bloquer tous les fichiers témoins de ce site, mais ceci pourrait affecter certaines caractéristiques ou services du site. Afin d'en apprendre plus sur les fichiers témoins que nous utilisons et comment les supprimer, cliquez ici pour lire notre politique de confidentialité.

Si vous ne désirez pas continuer, veuillez appuyer ici afin de quitter le site.

Cachez l'avis

  Nav. principale
"All Labor Has Dignity"
Couverture de "All Labor Has Dignity"
"All Labor Has Dignity"

An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice

Covering all the civil rights movement highlights--Montgomery, Albany, Birmingham, Selma, Chicago, and Memphis--award-winning historian Michael K. Honey introduces and traces Dr. King's dream of economic equality. Gathered in one volume for the first time, the majority of these speeches will be new to most readers. The collection begins with King's lectures to unions in the 1960s and includes his addresses made during his Poor People's Campaign, culminating with his momentous "Mountaintop" speech, delivered in support of striking black sanitation workers in Memphis. Unprecedented and timely, "All Labor Has Dignity" will more fully restore our understanding of King's lasting vision of economic justice, bringing his demand for equality right into the present.

An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice

Covering all the civil rights movement highlights--Montgomery, Albany, Birmingham, Selma, Chicago, and Memphis--award-winning historian Michael K. Honey introduces and traces Dr. King's dream of economic equality. Gathered in one volume for the first time, the majority of these speeches will be new to most readers. The collection begins with King's lectures to unions in the 1960s and includes his addresses made during his Poor People's Campaign, culminating with his momentous "Mountaintop" speech, delivered in support of striking black sanitation workers in Memphis. Unprecedented and timely, "All Labor Has Dignity" will more fully restore our understanding of King's lasting vision of economic justice, bringing his demand for equality right into the present.

Formats disponibles-
  • OverDrive Read
Langues:-
Copies-
  • Disponible:
    0
  • Copies de la bibliothèque:
    1
Niveaux-
  • Niveau ATOS:
  • Lexile Measure:
  • Niveau d'intérêt:
  • Difficulté du texte:

Recommandé pour vous

Extraits-
  • From the book

    National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace Chicago, Illinois, November 11, 1967

    Mr. Chairman, distinguished guests, my brothers and sisters of the labor movement, ladies and gentlemen. I need not pause to say how very delighted I am to be here this afternoon and to be some little part of this extremely significant assembly. . . . I don't feel that I come among strangers today for I feel that I'm an honorary member of many labor unions all across the country. (Applause) In fact, I think Cleve Robinson and Dave Livingston of District 65 in New York made me an honorary member a long time ago and I've been a 65er a long time. . . . I want to try to talk very honestly and frankly about this great problem, this great issue that we face as a result of the war in Vietnam. Some of my words may appear to be rather harsh, but they will be as harsh as truth and as gentle as a nonviolent devotee would be. (Laughter)

    I want to use as a subject "The Domestic Impact of the War in America." This question is historic because it is an authentic expression of the conscience of the labor movement. As has been said already this afternoon, tens of millions of Americans oppose the war in Vietnam. Never in our history has there been such a passionate, popular resistance to a current war. In addition to the millions upon millions of ordinary people, eminent scholars, distinguished senators, journalists, businessmen, professionals, students, and political leaders at all levels have protested the war and offered alternatives with an amazing tenacity and boldness.

    But one voice was missing--the loud, clear voice of labor. The absence of that one voice was all the more tragic because it may be the decisive one for tipping the balance toward peace. Labor has been missing. For too long the moral appeal has been flickering, not shining as it did in its dynamic days of growth. This conference, a united expression of varied branches of labor, reaffirms that the trade union movement is part of forward-looking America. (Applause) That no matter what the formal resolutions of higher bodies may be, the troubled conscience of the working people cannot be stilled. This conference speaks for millions. You here today will long be remembered as those who had the courage to speak out and the wisdom to be right.

    It is noteworthy that the Labor Party of Great Britain, which, of course, has no responsibility for our actions, nonetheless went on record on October 4 in a formal national resolution calling upon its Labor government to dissociate itself completely from U.S. policy in Vietnam. (Applause) It urged its government to persuade the United States to end the bombing of North Vietnam immediately, permanently, and unconditionally.

    Now what are some of the domestic consequences of the war in Vietnam? It has made the Great Society a myth and replaced it with a troubled and confused society. The war has strengthened domestic reaction. It has given the extreme right, the anti-labor, anti-Negro, and antihumanistic forces a weapon of spurious patriotism to galvanize its supporters into reaching for power, right up to the White House. It hopes to use national frustration to take control and restore the America of social insecurity and power for the privileged. When a Hollywood performer, lacking distinction even as an actor [Ronald Reagan], can become a leading war-hawk candidate for the presidency, only the irrationalities induced by a war psychosis can explain such a melancholy turn of events. (Applause)

    The war in Vietnam has produced a shameful order of priorities in which the...

Au sujet de l’auteur-
  • Michael K. Honey, a former Southern civil rights organizer, is professor of labor and ethnic history and of humanities at the University of Washington-Tacoma. The author of three books, including Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign, he lives in Tacoma.
Critiques-
  • Library Journal

    November 1, 2010

    A gathering of King's speeches to remind readers that his campaign for civil rights was as much about economic justice as desegregation. Editor Honey includes prepared formal lectures by King as well as his extemporaneous "Mountaintop" speech given the night before his assassination.

    Copyright 2010 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    December 1, 2010
    King was in the midst of cultivating an alliance between the civil rights movement and labor unions when he was assassinated in 1968. He was in Memphis to support a strike by black sanitation workers and was planning the Poor Peoples Campaign, advocating for jobs, unionization, and dignity for all workers. Despite the sometimes prickly relationship between African Americans and unions with members eager to protect jobs by discrimination, King made substantial inroads with many union leaders. Honey, scholar and former civil rights organizer, offers a collection of 15 of Kings speeches (12 previously unpublished) on workers rights. Drawing on archival material from the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Honey reforms Kings image from civil rights activist to labor activist. In speeches delivered in venues including a 1961 AFL-CIO convention in Miami and a meeting with Teamsters in New York in 1967, Kings words put into perspective the labor movement since the 1930s and its links to the civil rights movement via such similar tactics as sit-ins, boycotts, and strikes. This important collection broadens our perception of Kings vision of social justice.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2010, American Library Association.)

  • Nell Irvin Painter, author of The History of White People "Thanks to Michael Honey's meticulous editing and the inclusion of rarely heard audio, we can finally grasp the depth of the Rev. Martin Luther King's commitment to Americans as workers."
  • Bill Fletcher, Jr., Editorial Board, BlackCommentator.com; co-founder, Center for Labor Renewal; Board Chairperson, International Labor Rights "This is more than a compelling and unprecedented collection of speeches by Martin Luther King, Jr. Through thoughtful introductions to each and every speech, Honey sets the stage for the reader, proving without a doubt that Dr. King was among the greatest labor leaders of the 20th century and that his message continues to resonate powerfully in our age."
  • Nell Irvin Painter, author of The History of White People and Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, Princeton University "Thanks to Michael Honey''s meticulous editing and the inclusion of rarely heard audio, we can finally grasp the depth of the Reverend Martin Luther King''s commitment to Americans as workers. Now, more than ever, his insights show us the way of transformation from consumers divided by race and ethnicity into an active, united citizenry."
Informations sur le titre+
  • Éditeur
    Beacon Press
  • OverDrive Read
    Date de publication:
Informations relatives aux droits numériques+
  • La protection des droits d'auteur (DRM) exigée par l'éditeur peut s'appliquer à ce titre afin d'en limiter ou d'en interdire la copie ou l'impression. Il est interdit de partager les fichiers ou de les redistribuer. Vos droits d'accès à ce matériel expireront à la fin de la période d'emprunt. Veuillez consulter l'avis important à propos du matériel protégé par droits d'auteur pour les conditions qui s'appliquent à ce contenu.

Status bar:

Vous avez atteint votre limite d'emprunt.

Accédez à votre page Emprunts pour gérer vos titres.

Close

Vous avez déjà emprunté ce titre.

Vous souhaitez accéder à votre page Emprunts?

Close

Limite de recommandations atteinte.

Vous avez atteint le nombre maximal de titres que vous pouvez recommander pour l'instant. Vous pouvez recommander jusqu'à 99 titres tous les 1 jours.

Close

Connectez-vous pour recommander ce titre.

Recommandez à votre bibliothèque qu'elle ajoute ce titre à la collection numérique.

Close

Plus de détails

Close
Close

Disponibilité limitée

La disponibilité peut changer durant le mois selon le budget de la bibliothèque.

est disponible pendant jours.

Une fois que la lecture débute, vous avez heures pour visionner le titre.

Close

Permission

Close

Le format OverDrive de ce livre électronique comporte ne narration professionnelle qui joue pendant que vous lisez dans votre navigateur. Apprenez-en plus ici.

Close

Réservations

Nombre total de retenues:


Close

Accès restreint

Certaines options de formatage ont été désactivées. Il est possible que vous voyiez d'autres options de téléchargement en dehors de ce réseau.

Close

Vous avez atteint votre limite de commandes à la bibliothèque pour les titres numériques.

Pour faire de la place à plus d'emprunts, vous pouvez retourner des titres à partir de votre page Emprunts.

Close

Limite d'emprunts atteinte

Vous avez emprunté et rendu un nombre excessif d'articles sur votre compte pendant une courte période de temps. Essayez de nouveau dans quelques jours.

Si vous n'arrivez toujours pas à emprunter des titres au bout de 7 jours, veuillez contacter le service de support.

Close

Vous avez déjà emprunté ce titre. Pour y accéder, revenez à votre page Emprunts.

Close

Ce titre n'est pas disponible pour votre type de carte. Si vous pensez qu'il s'agit d'une erreur contactez le service de support.

Close

Une erreur inattendue s'est produite.

Si ce problème persiste, veuillez contacter le service de support.

Close

Close

Remarque: Barnes & Noble® peut changer cette liste d'appareils à tout moment.

Close
Achetez maintenant
et aidez votre bibliothèque à GAGNER !
"All Labor Has Dignity"
"All Labor Has Dignity"
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Choisissez un des détaillants ci-dessous pour acheter ce titre.
Une part de cet achat est destinée à soutenir votre bibliothèque.
Si vous cliquez sur le lien « Achetez-le maintenant » vous quitterez la plateforme de téléchargement du site Web de votre bibliothèque numérique. Le contenu du site Web marchand n'est pas contrôlé par la bibliothèque. Veuillez être conscient que ce site Web n'a pas la même politique sur la protection de la vie privée que la bibliothèque ou que ses fournisseurs de service.
Close
Close

Il ne reste plus d'exemplaire de cette parution. Veuillez essayer d'emprunter ce titre de nouveau lorsque la prochaine parution sera disponible.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Se connecter

Sur la prochaine page, on vous demandera de vous connecter à votre compte de bibliothèque.

Si c'est la première fois que vous sélectionnez « Envoyer à mon NOOK », vous serez redirigé sur une page de Barnes & Noble pour vous connecter à (ou créer) votre compte NOOK. Vous devriez n'avoir qu'à vous connecter une seule fois à votre compte NOOK afin de le relier à votre compte de bibliothèque. Après cette étape unique, les publications périodiques seront automatiquement envoyées à votre compte NOOK lorsque vous sélectionnez « Envoyer à mon NOOK ».

La première fois que vous sélectionnez « Send to NOOK » (Envoyer à mon NOOK), vous serez redirigé sur la page de Barnes & Nobles pour vous connecter à (ou créer) votre compte NOOK. Vous devriez n'avoir qu'à vous connecter une seule fois à votre compte NOOK afin de le relier à votre compte de bibliothèque. Après cette étape unique, les publications périodiques seront automatiquement envoyées à votre compte NOOK lorsque vous sélectionnez « Send to NOOK » (Envoyer à mon NOOK).

Vous pouvez lire des publications périodiques sur n'importe quelle tablette NOOK ou dans l'application de lecture NOOK gratuite pour iOS, Android ou Windows 8.

Accepter pour continuerAnnuler