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Discovering Wes Moore
Cover of Discovering Wes Moore
Discovering Wes Moore
by Wes Moore
Borrow

For fans of The Wire and Unbroken comes a story of two fatherless boys from Baltimore, both named Wes Moore. One is in prison, serving a life sentence for murder. The other is a Rhodes Scholar, an army veteran, and an author whose book is being turned into a movie produced by Oprah Winfrey.
 
The story of “the other Wes Moore” is one that the author couldn’t get out of his mind, not since he learned that another boy with his name—just two years his senior—grew up in the same Baltimore neighborhood. He wrote that boy—now a man—a letter, not expecting to receive a reply. But a reply came, and a friendship grew, as letters turned into visits and the two men got to know each other. Eventually, that friendship became the inspiration for Discovering Wes Moore, a moving and cautionary tale examining the factors that contribute to success and failure—and the choices that make all the difference.
 
Two men. One overcame adversity. The other suffered the indignities of poverty. Their stories are chronicled in Discovering Wes Moore, a book for young people based on Wes Moore’s bestselling adult memoir, The Other Wes Moore.
 
Includes an 8-page photo insert.


Praise for Discovering Wes Moore
 
“Moore wisely opens the door for teens to contemplate their own answers and beliefs, while laying out his own experiences honestly and openly.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“He argues earnestly and convincingly that young people can overcome the obstacles in their lives when they make the right choices and accept the support of caring adults.”—Kirkus Reviews

For fans of The Wire and Unbroken comes a story of two fatherless boys from Baltimore, both named Wes Moore. One is in prison, serving a life sentence for murder. The other is a Rhodes Scholar, an army veteran, and an author whose book is being turned into a movie produced by Oprah Winfrey.
 
The story of “the other Wes Moore” is one that the author couldn’t get out of his mind, not since he learned that another boy with his name—just two years his senior—grew up in the same Baltimore neighborhood. He wrote that boy—now a man—a letter, not expecting to receive a reply. But a reply came, and a friendship grew, as letters turned into visits and the two men got to know each other. Eventually, that friendship became the inspiration for Discovering Wes Moore, a moving and cautionary tale examining the factors that contribute to success and failure—and the choices that make all the difference.
 
Two men. One overcame adversity. The other suffered the indignities of poverty. Their stories are chronicled in Discovering Wes Moore, a book for young people based on Wes Moore’s bestselling adult memoir, The Other Wes Moore.
 
Includes an 8-page photo insert.


Praise for Discovering Wes Moore
 
“Moore wisely opens the door for teens to contemplate their own answers and beliefs, while laying out his own experiences honestly and openly.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“He argues earnestly and convincingly that young people can overcome the obstacles in their lives when they make the right choices and accept the support of caring adults.”—Kirkus Reviews

Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    6.0
  • Lexile:
    840
  • Interest Level:
    MG+
  • Text Difficulty:
    4 - 5

Recommended for you

About the Author-
  • WES MOORE is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and was a Rhodes Scholar. He served as a paratrooper and captain in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan and as a White House Fellow in the U.S. Department of State. He is executive producer of the three-part PBS series Coming Back with Wes Moore. Moore was named one of the top young business leaders in America and has appeared on the cover of Time magazine, which featured him in the article “The New Greatest Generation.” Wes lives in Baltimore with his wife and daughter.

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    September 24, 2012
    Moore adapts his bestselling adult title, The Other Wes Moore, for teens in this thought-provoking and personal narrative about two men with the same name. Moore begins with his own story, which starts in Baltimore and moves to the crack-infested Bronx, military school, Johns Hopkins, and a Rhodes Scholarship. The second part of the book tells the other Wes Moore's journey, which also begins in Baltimore but leads to drug dealing, brushes with the police, and a life sentence for murder. Anecdotes from Moore's early years convey his struggle to form an identitywithin his violent and impoverished surroundings; his love for his family and his core optimism shine through even the darkest moments he recounts. The story concludes with Moore's questions and ruminations about how, regardless of limitations and societal expectations, the decisions an individual makes determine who he or she will become. Moore wisely opens the door for teens to contemplate their own answers and beliefs, while laying out his own experiences honestly and openly. Ages 12–up. Agent: Linda Loewenthal, David Black Literary.

  • Kirkus

    August 1, 2012
    This story, an adaptation for young people of the adult memoir The Other Wes Moore (2008), explores the lives of two young African-American men who share the same name and grew up impoverished on the same inner-city streets but wound up taking completely different paths. Author Moore grew up with a devoted mother and extended family. After receiving poor grades and falling in with a bad crowd, his family pooled their limited finances to send him to Valley Forge Military Academy, where he found positive role models and became a Corps commander and star athlete. After earning an undergraduate degree, Wes attended Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. When the author read about the conviction of another Wes Moore for armed robbery and killing a police officer, he wanted to find out how two youths growing up at the same time in the same place could take such divergent paths. The author learns that the other Wes never had the extensive family support, the influential mentors or the lucky breaks he enjoyed. Unfortunately, the other Wes Moore is not introduced until over two-thirds of the way through the narrative. The story of the other Wes is heavily truncated and rushed, as is the author's conclusion, in which he argues earnestly and convincingly that young people can overcome the obstacles in their lives when they make the right choices and accept the support of caring adults. Though awkward, this adaptation still makes for a hopeful and inspiring story. (Memoir. 12 & up)

    COPYRIGHT(2012) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    March 1, 2013

    Gr 8 Up-Wes Moore-two different people from the same area with the same name. One graduated with honors from military school and was the first African American graduate of Johns Hopkins to become a Rhodes Scholar. The other Wes Moore landed in prison; he is serving a life sentence for murder. Both men were children of single mothers who worked hard to keep their sons out of trouble and keep food on the table. Why and where did their paths diverge? In 2010, the author wrote of his experiences and successes in The Other Wes Moore (Spiegel & Grau, 2010), and he has now adapted that book for teen readers. He talks of his own accomplishments and life experiences as a kid who might have gone astray had his mother not sent him to Valley Forge. While he was at Oxford, his mother told him of the other young man, and he never quite forgot about him. He started writing him letters, and, surprisingly, Wes responded from prison. The two men struck up a rapport that continued through letters and visits to the prison. This book is well written and is an interesting and engaging story, although it is a bit rushed, at times. It's a thought-provoking read that will cause teens to question their own lives and decisions, and, hopefully, show how adults can lend help, even when they think it's not necessary.-Traci Glass, Eugene Public Library, OR

    Copyright 2013 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    October 1, 2012
    Grades 7-12 The title of this memoir isn't a metaphor; it's an astonishing fact. In a poor Bronx 1980s neighborhood, Moore's single-parent mom worked multiple jobs so that he could attend private school, and she raged about his low grades as he tried to fit into both worlds. ( I was ashamed of being embarrassed about my own home. ) After he narrowly escapes prison, she sends him to military school, and at 15, he becomes the youngest sergeant in the entire corps; at 16, a paratrooper. His hero is Colin Powell. But then Wes discovers, literally, another Wes Moore, who is like his double. This Wes, who grew up in the 'hood, dealt drugs, and spent time in juvie, wanted to quit dealing and support his kids, but he ended up shooting a cop and received a life sentence in prison, where the author visits him. The messages are loud and purposeful but never simple, and readers will recognize the scary truth: his story could have been mine. Great for group discussion, this includes a final resource list and photographs.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2012, American Library Association.)

  • Kirkus Reviews "This adaptation . . . makes for a hopeful and inspiring story."
  • Publishers Weekly, Starred Review "A moving exploration."
  • Booklist, Starred Review "A haunting look at two lives."
  • O: The Oprah Magazine "Moore vividly and powerfully describes not just the culture of the streets but how it feels to be a boy growing up in a world where violence makes you a man."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Random House Children's Books
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