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After Tupac & D Foster
Cover of After Tupac & D Foster
After Tupac & D Foster
Borrow

A Newbery Honor Book
The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend's lives, the world opens up for them. Suddenly they're keenly aware of things beyond their block in Queens, things that are happening in the world—like the shooting of Tupac Shakur—and in search of their Big Purpose in life. When—all too soon—D's mom swoops in to reclaim her, and Tupac dies, they are left with a sense of how quickly things can change and how even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.
Includes a Discussion Guide by Jacqueline Woodson
"A slender, note-perfect novel."—The Washington Post
"The subtlety and depth with which the author conveys the girls' relationships lend this novel exceptional vividness and staying power."—Publishers Weekly
"Jacqueline Woodson has written another absorbing story that all readers—especially those who have felt the loss of a friendship—will identify with."—Children's Literature

"Woodson creates a thought-provoking story about the importance of acceptance and connections in life."—VOYA


From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Newbery Honor Book
The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend's lives, the world opens up for them. Suddenly they're keenly aware of things beyond their block in Queens, things that are happening in the world—like the shooting of Tupac Shakur—and in search of their Big Purpose in life. When—all too soon—D's mom swoops in to reclaim her, and Tupac dies, they are left with a sense of how quickly things can change and how even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.
Includes a Discussion Guide by Jacqueline Woodson
"A slender, note-perfect novel."—The Washington Post
"The subtlety and depth with which the author conveys the girls' relationships lend this novel exceptional vividness and staying power."—Publishers Weekly
"Jacqueline Woodson has written another absorbing story that all readers—especially those who have felt the loss of a friendship—will identify with."—Children's Literature

"Woodson creates a thought-provoking story about the importance of acceptance and connections in life."—VOYA


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    3
  • Library copies:
    4
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    4.7
  • Lexile:
    750
  • Interest Level:
    UG
  • Text Difficulty:
    3 - 4

Recommended for you

 
Awards-
Excerpts-
  • From the book The summer before D Foster's real mama came and took her away, Tupac wasn't dead yet. He'd been shot five times—two in the head, two down by his leg and thing and one shot that went in his hand and came out the other side and went through a vein or something. All the doctors were saying he should have died and were bringing other doctors up to his room to show everybody what a medical miracle he was. That's what they called him. A Medical Miracle. Like he wasn't even a real person. Like he was just something to be looked at and turned this way and that way and poked at. Like he wasn't Tupac.

    D Foster showed up a few months before Tupac got shot that first time and left us the summer before he died. By the time her mama came and got her and she took one last walk on out of our lives, I felt like we'd grown up and grown old and lived a hundred lives in those few years that we knew her. But we hadn't really. We'd just gone from being eleven to being thirteen. Three girls. Three the Hard Way. In the end, it was just me and Neeka again.

    The first time Tupac got shot, it was November 1994. Cold as anything everywhere in the city and me, Neeka, D and everybody else was shivering our behinds through the winter with nobody thinking Pac was gonna make it. Then, right after he had some surgery, he checked himself out of the hospital even though the doctors was trying to tell him he wasn't well enough to be doing that. That's when everybody around here started talking about what a true gangsta he was. At least that's what all the kids were thinking. The churchgoing people just kept saying he had God with him. Some of the parents were saying what they'd always been saying about him—that he was heading right to what he got because he was a bad example for kids, especially black kids like us. Crazy stuff about Tupac being a disgrace to the race and blah, blah, blah. The wannabe gangsta kids just kept saying Tupac was gonna get revenge on whoever did that to him.

    But when I saw Tupac like that—coming out of the hospital, all skinny and small-looking in that wheelchair, big guards around him—I remember thinking, He ain't gonna try to get revenge on nobody and he ain't trying to be a disgrace to anybody either. Just trying to keep on. Even though he wasn't smiling, I knew he was just happy and confused about still being alive.

    Went on like that all winter long, then February came and they sent Tupac to jail for some dumb stuff and people started talking about that—the negative peeps talking about that's where he needed to be and all the rest of us saying how messed up the law was when you didn't look and act like people thought you should.

    Spring came and Pac dropped his album from prison and this one song on it was real tight, so we all just listened to it and talked about how bad-ass Pac was—that he wasn't even gonna let being in jail stop him from making his music. Me and Neeka and D had all turned twelve by then, but we still believed stuff—like that we'd grow up and marry beautiful rapper guys who'd buy us huge houses out in the country. We talked about how they'd be all crazy over us and if some other girl walked by who was fine or something, they wouldn't even turn their heads to look because they'd be so in love with us and all. Stupid stuff like that.

    In jail, Pac started getting clear about thug life, saying it wasn't the right thing. He got all righteous about it and whatnot, and with all the rappers shooting on each other and stuff, it wasn't hard to agree with him.

    Time kept passing on that way. Things and people changing. First, D turned thirteen, then me and Neeka were right there behind her—us all...

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    Starred review from December 10, 2007
    As she did in Feathers
    with the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Woodson here invokes the music of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, whose songs address the inequalities confronting many African-Americans. In 1994, the anonymous narrator is 11, and Tupac has been shot. Everyone in her safe Queens neighborhood is listening to his music and talking about him, even though the world he sings about seems remote to her. Meanwhile D, a foster child, meets the narrator and her best friend, Neeka, while roaming around the city by herself (“She’s like from another planet. The Planet of the Free,” Neeka later remarks). They become close, calling themselves Three the Hard Way, and Tupac’s music becomes a soundtrack for the two years they spend together. Early on, when Tupac sings, ''Brenda’s Got a Baby,’’ about a girl putting her baby in a trash can, D explains, ''He sings about the things that I’m living,’’ and Neeka and the narrator become aware of all the ''stuff we ain’t gonna know ,’’ who never does tell them where she lives or who her mother is. The story ends in 1996 with Tupac’s untimely death and the reappearance of D’s mother, who takes D with her, out of roaming range. Woodson delicately unfolds issues about race and less obvious forms of oppression as the narrator becomes aware of them; occasionally, the plot feels manipulated toward that purpose. Even so, the subtlety and depth with which the author conveys the girls’ relationships lend this novel exceptional vividness and staying power. Ages 12-up.

  • School Library Journal

    Starred review from April 1, 2008
    Gr 6-10-D Foster, Neeka, and an unnamed narrator grow from being 11 to 13 with Tupac Shakur's music, shootings, and legal troubles as the backdrop. Neeka and the narrator have lived on the same block forever and are like sisters, but foster child D shows up during the summer of 1994, while she is out "roaming." D immediately finds a place in the heart of the other girls, and the "Three the Hard Way" bond over their love of Tupac's music. It seems especially relevant to D, who sees truth in his lyrics, having experienced the hard life herself in group homes and with multiple foster families. Woodson's spare, poetic, language and realistic Queens, NY, street vernacular reveal a time and a relationship, each chapter a vignette depicting an event in the lives of the girls and evoking mood more than telling a story. In this urban setting, there are, refreshingly, caring adults and children playing on the street instead of drug dealers on every corner. Readers are right on the block with bossy mothers, rope-jumping girls, and chess-playing elders. With Tupac's name and picture on the cover, this slim volume will immediately appeal to teens, and the emotions and high-quality writing make it a book well worth recommending. By the end, readers realize that, along with the girls, they don't really know D at all. As she says, "I came on this street and y'all became my friends. That's the D puzzle." And readers will find it a puzzle well worth their time."Kelly Vikstrom, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, MD"

    Copyright 2008 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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    Penguin Young Readers Group
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